Russell Moore Leaving ERLC, Joins Christianity Today

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Russell Moore, president of the SBC Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission, is leaving ERLC to join the staff of Christianity Today as a public theologian, according to Religion News Service. He begins the new role this summer.

Moore will lead a new Public Theology Project, said Tim Dalrymple, president and CEO of Christianity Today. That project will host events and gatherings about public theology and publish content, including Moore’s writing and his Signposts podcast, RNS reported.

“I’ve struggled with this decision, because my gratitude for the honor of serving the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission is so deep. As I conclude my time serving Southern Baptists as ERLC president, I am filled with gratitude as well as excitement for the future,” Moore said in a statement. I’ve struggled with this decision, because my gratitude for the honor of serving the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission is so deep. As I conclude my time serving Southern Baptists as ERLC president, I am filled with gratitude as well as excitement for the future.”

Moore, a native of Biloxi, Mississippi, was appointed in June 2013 as the eighth president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission. Before taking that post he was the dean of the School of Theology and senior vice president for academic administration at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky. He joined the faculty there as professor of Christian theology and ethics in 2001 and became dean in 2004. For four years of his tenure at Southern, Moore also served as preaching pastor at Highview Baptist Church.

Moore is also the author of several books on Christian theology, ethics, and living, most recently The Courage to Stand: Facing Your Fear without Losing Your Soul. His first book, The Kingdom of Christ: The New Evangelical Perspective, was adapted from his doctoral dissertation at Southern and examined Christian sociopolitical engagement especially through the work of Christianity Today‘s first editor, Carl F. H. Henry. Moore has had a long association with Henry’s legacy; at Southern, for example, he served as executive director of the Carl F. H. Henry Institute for Evangelical Engagement from 2001 to 2009.

Read his full statement here.

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—By CNJ Staff

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