Oklahoma governor signs ‘Humanity of the Unborn Child Act’

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This November, Oklahoma residents will start seeing state-sponsored, pro-life messages.

Gov. Mary Fallin signed The Humanity of the Unborn Child Act on June 6, with the goal of moving the state toward “an abortion-free society,” according to the bill.

Mary Fallin, Governor of Oklahoma.
Mary Fallin, Governor of Oklahoma.

The new law requires the State Department of Health to develop and distribute educational material about babies developing in the womb and maintain on its website “a comprehensive list” of agencies and services that help women through pregnancy and childbirth. The material must be geared toward helping women through pregnancy and promoting adoption instead of abortion.

The health department website also will include this statement: “There are many public and private agencies willing and able to help you carry your child to term and assist you and your child after your child is born, whether you choose to keep your child or to place him or her for adoption. The State of Oklahoma strongly urges you to contact them if you are pregnant.”

The health department must also create “materials designed to provide accurate, scientifically verifiable information concerning the child at two-week gestational intervals.” The material will show pictures of developing babies inside the womb, and public service announcements will “clearly and consistently teach that abortion kills a living human being.”

In addition, the new law requires the State Department of Education to cooperate. Oklahoma’s highschoolers will soon learn about the stages of a baby’s development under a program the Department of Education must create.

Tony Lauinger, director of Oklahomans for Life, said the education program is a key part of the law.

“When young people have a good understanding—in advance—of the development and humanity of the unborn child, they are much less likely to view abortion as an acceptable ‘solution’ to an unwanted pregnancy,” Lauinger said.

The law forbids any program or state employee from referring pregnant students to abortion providers.

The law takes effect Nov. 1.

— by Samantha Gobba

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