Make a Difference: Young Christians Need to Get Involved in Politics

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The nation needs you. The community needs you. Future generations need you to select the right people into office. Or else, we all lose as a nation under God. If we don’t get involved in local and national elections, someone else will make our decisions for us.

This year, more Gen Zers will be able to vote in the presidential election and they have the power to shape the political landscape. What will their impact be? A poll from the Pew Research Center found those between the ages of 13 to 21 believe in increasing government power, pro-abortion and are more likely to approve of NFL players kneeling during the national anthem as a sign of protest. 

“This compares with 38 percent of Gen Xers, 43 percent of Boomers and 54 percent of Silents. Similarly, while majorities in Gen Z and the Millennial generation say government should do more to solve problems, rather than that government is doing too many things better left to businesses and individuals, Gen Xers and Boomers are more evenly divided on this issue. For their part, most Silents would like to see a less activist government,” Pew found. Additionally, 85 percent of Boomer Republicans believe president Trump is doing a good job, while 50 percent of Gen Zers support the his policies.

Voter turnout during the 2018 midterm elections was the highest since 1966. That’s good news. Conversely, attendance in local elections for both Republicans and Democrats continues to plummet across the nation. The U.S. is 31st out of 35 countries for voter turnout. When it comes to mayoral elections, the numbers are more disconcerting. Turnout in 10 of America’s 30 largest cities was “less than 15 percent. In Las Vegas, Ft. Worth and Dallas, turnout was in the single digits,” researchers at Portland State University found.

Low engagement and the lack of knowledge about civics among people is a factor. People also assume their votes will not make a difference, so why bother? When we don’t vote, someone else decides for you — leading to detrimental policies in communities. Voting or not voting locally impacts zoning laws, development projects, speed limits, school boards, the police department and more in our neighborhoods. 

An example of this is Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y. 14th District). She won the Congressional election with only 16,000 votes out of an estimated 700,000 people in her region. When she presented the New Green Deal, which included the government taking away cars, reducing air travel and giving equitable pay for all people regardless of education — many panicked, and rightfully so. This is just another reason people need to vote in local and national elections. Remember, less than two percent voted for AOC and this conversation would be obsolete if people voted for her challenger. “If you look at the people on the top of the ticket on the Democrat side, they’re advocating for what I call the six horsemen of the Apocalypse, which are the restrictions of religious beliefs, the Green New Deal, Medicare for all, gun confiscation, open borders and late-term abortions — the most horrific of them in a lot of ways,” said Constitutional Conservative Daniel Gade, who is challenging Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) in 2020.  

Another factor, we can look at is how vital freedom of religion is presently and for future generations. Christians are experiencing an increased rate of discrimination. The study found 50 percent of American adults believe that evangelicals are subjected to discrimination. This is an increase from 42 percent in 2016. “One in five (18 percent) say that Evangelicals—about a quarter of the population—face a lot of discrimination. Jews are also seeing an uptick in discrimination,” researchers discovered. “In this year’s survey, roughly two-thirds of Americans (64 percent) also say Jews face at least some discrimination in the U.S., up 20 percentage points from the last time this question was asked in 2016. More say Jews face some discrimination than a lot (39 percent vs. 24 percent).”

We are in a crucial period in America. We can speak the truth through voting and taking action, even it’s making calls on behalf of candidates. God needs you. The nation needs you. The community needs you. Future generations need you to select the right people into office. Whether it’s a school board or mayoral election, it matters. Volunteering matters, small or on a more consequential scale. All of us are a spoke in the wheel.

 

Corine Gatti-Santillo has spent two decades as an editor, investigative reporter and web content strategist; her work has appeared in The Christian Post, LifeZette and CBN, among other outlets. She is host of the program “Mom on the Right” on The Liberty Beacon TV. She and her husband, Rocky, live in Virginia with their infant daughter and yellow lab Maggie.

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