‘Do Good’ Shines a Spotlight on Everyday Americans

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Do Good” is a 10-episode docu-series first launched in March on YouTube, reporting the efforts made by everyday Americans serving those overwhelmed by Category 4 Hurricane Laura in Southwest Louisiana and Hurricane Delta during the peak of the coronavirus in 2020. 

Veteran, director, producer, and former chaplain Justin Roberts said it’s time to shine a light on those sacrificing for others. Many of whom lost loved ones, property, and nearly their lives during the hurricanes of 2020.

“I think that was the biggest thing that took us back is we can’t get lost in the disaster and the shock and awe of it,” Roberts, also known as “Chappy,” told CNJ. “But there are certain things that take you back. And people who lost their homes were still showing up every single day to donate their time to other people.”

Roberts, an Afghanistan Army veteran, experienced destruction first-hand overseas. He filmed his first documentary was called “No Greater Love” in a war zone. That film explored a combat deployment through the eyes of an Army chaplain, as he and his men fight their way through a hellish tour in one of the most dangerous places in Afghanistan and then as they struggle to reintegrate home. “And I did that while in combat. So what I noticed when I was overseas is people always seemed to rise up when there are incredibly traumatic challenges. And so I knew that there would be people stepping up, and I wanted to find out who those people are going to be. The best way to make a difference is by telling a story because I have no construction skills and no carpentry skills.”

Funds raised by watching the series online go through United Way of Southwest Louisiana to those charities or individuals they want to cover. “So it gives us a little bit more liberty if we want to try to help build a home for somebody or whatever the cause may be, we can do that through the United Way,” said Roberts, who also partnered with Hank Barbe, a former combat medic turned rock musician on the project.

Asked why he preferred the documentary to air on YouTube and Facebook, Roberts explained they could monetize views, giving them funds to donate to the charities. If it were another platform, then it would be a flat fee. “With this, the potential is raised incredibly; it all becomes based on what the audience wants to do. If they mobilize for this, it can become an incredible fundraiser for these charities on the frontlines.”

During the contentious election, two towns were just wiped away and gone. And with barely a whisper. Any one of us could be in the crosshairs of a natural disaster.

“It’s our disaster today, but it’s going to be another community tomorrow. So how do we want the country to respond when these disasters hit? And what can we do? So it’s coming. And what we’re seeing is, severity and frequency of disasters are increasing. So this isn’t a conversation that we should have; after the storm, we need to have it before. So we can save lives. It’s not enough just for the government to respond to these situations, and we have to respond as communities.”

“Do Good” is donating 100 percent of monetized views to the featured charities. This will allow people who don’t have the means to donate to make a difference still. Everyone can do good by watching and sharing.

Join the #DoGoodArmy today.

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-By Corine Gatti-Santillo

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